The Wren's Nest

This Nation's Most Exciting House Museum

35 notes

laphamsquarterly:

“From what I know of the effect of these holidays upon the slave, I believe them to be among the most effective means in the hands of the slaveholder in keeping down the spirit of insurrection. Were the slaveholders at once to abandon this practice, I have not the slightest doubt it would lead to an immediate insurrection among the slaves.”—Frederick Douglass on Christmas, 1833

laphamsquarterly:

“From what I know of the effect of these holidays upon the slave, I believe them to be among the most effective means in the hands of the slaveholder in keeping down the spirit of insurrection. 

Were the slaveholders at once to abandon this practice, I have not the slightest doubt it would lead to an immediate insurrection among the slaves.”

Frederick Douglass on Christmas, 1833

4,366 notes

scuffalong:

cocobutterblues:

notesonascandal:

Amazing Life Magazine Photo Essay

Watts, Los Angeles, CA, 1966

This looks so fresh & contemporary. 

It looks fresh and contemporary because EVERYTHING we do today, things credited to “creative” people, was actually done by our grandparents 40 years ago. 

Truth hurts.

…and before that.

770 notes

so-treu:

moniquill:

thewhitemankilledthetruth:

thegoddamazon:

And let’s not forget what the tar baby was supposed to represent…

The funny thing is, this isn’t a story that’s supposed to be offensive, white people just made it that way with their fuckery
The Br’er rabbit stories all originated as Anasi stories
And a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots

a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots
a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots
a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots
a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots
a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots

ahhhhh omg i had this book as a kid
more specifically, Joel Chandler Harris (the white dude) gathered these stories from African American slaves on the Turnwold Plantation, where he worked from age 17-21 as a printers apprentince. so it’s not just that the African roots of the stories were disregarded, it’s that the African American voices that told him this stories were literally erased as he attributed all the stories to a fictional “Uncle Remus” who of course spoke in a bastardized AAVE.

I’m not so sure the voices were erased—though perhaps the tone was changed to fit the audience. Just as there were Brer Rabbit stories for kids and Brer Rabbit stories for adults, there were also Brer Rabbit stories for white folks. Still, if you read the Uncle Remus tales, you’ll find multiple narrators (Remus included) speaking in multiple dialects. And often what they’re getting at isn’t so flattering to their white, southern audience.

so-treu:

moniquill:

thewhitemankilledthetruth:

thegoddamazon:

And let’s not forget what the tar baby was supposed to represent…

The funny thing is, this isn’t a story that’s supposed to be offensive, white people just made it that way with their fuckery

The Br’er rabbit stories all originated as Anasi stories

And a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots

a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots

a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots

a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots

a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots

a white man stole them and used them to build his fortune, casting aside all of their african roots

ahhhhh omg i had this book as a kid

more specifically, Joel Chandler Harris (the white dude) gathered these stories from African American slaves on the Turnwold Plantation, where he worked from age 17-21 as a printers apprentince. so it’s not just that the African roots of the stories were disregarded, it’s that the African American voices that told him this stories were literally erased as he attributed all the stories to a fictional “Uncle Remus” who of course spoke in a bastardized AAVE.

I’m not so sure the voices were erased—though perhaps the tone was changed to fit the audience. Just as there were Brer Rabbit stories for kids and Brer Rabbit stories for adults, there were also Brer Rabbit stories for white folks. Still, if you read the Uncle Remus tales, you’ll find multiple narrators (Remus included) speaking in multiple dialects. And often what they’re getting at isn’t so flattering to their white, southern audience.

(Source: darkstinger, via robmarriott)

8 notes

7th Street Building to be Demolished

themidtownarchive:

image

Can’t say I’m at all surprised, but it’s really unfortunate that the Neel Reid-designed apartment building in the shadow of the Viewpoint tower will soon bite the dust.  The kicker is that the same block will soon sprout yet another Novare tower + parking deck, 100 6th Street.  I appreciate the added density, but IMO it’s not a fair trade architecturally.  Urban fabric needs to be finely grained - something that’s rarely possible in today’s building culture.  Quirks make a place lovable, and Midtown’s losing a piece of that.

Sigh.